Monday, March 07, 2005

Quiet Mornings

I love getting up early in the mornings. Last night the SO's son called at midnight, worried because he couldn't reach his dad. So I called early, everything was fine. Then I made my cup of Earl Grey and sat watching the early birds outside my window. Malachi, my black cat, was sitting under the forsythia, all tucked up and waiting for the day to come. He's learned that when he wants in he can come to the porch window and rattle around for me to open the door. But this morning he seemed content to just sit there while the birds flitted above him in the twiggy bushes.

My days are so peaceful. Dull, I imagine, to most people. I work on the computer until it's warm enough to go out and tend the rabbits. It's only a little walk down a hill to the old barn that I've known since childhood days of playing in the loft. I usually have a cat, one of three official residents of Greenberry House, following me or darting along the path I've worn already down the hill. I'm always talking as I come up to the bunny house door, to warn the bunnies that it's me and sometimes the cat will even listen! The rabbits greet me with rattling cages and eager faces; time for their morning treat and hay! I sweep up the floor; so much easier than the days of stacking cages and struggling with trays. Everyone gets their handful of hay and we talk and exchange bunny kisses.

In the meantime Lily has been having her morning time outside, sniffing and fussing with the cats with the occasional romp, if it's warm and she's feeling wild. The cats get their bowls of food, each one separate although they trade around because that other cat might have something better! In the winter I fill ten bird feeders, some in the old apple tree in the yard outside my favorite windows and some in the garden right by the window. I have a little feeder attached to the wall between the windows; lots of little birds come right to the house!

Lily and I come inside for her medicine and breakfast; by then I'm usually ready for another cuppa and some toast. The cockatiel gets his morning treat of a corn flake; he came here already mature and won't eat anything else except his regular feed. There's a betta here, too, that placidly swims in a big brandy snifter; he gets his breakfast, too.

After everyone is fed and content, I usually hit the computer, putting books and antiques up for sale on Tias.com and Biblio.com. Sometimes I do work for other people; this week I'm putting together a web site for a store in Stuart. I also do some data entry in accounting for my brother, who is Sammy Shelor of the Lonesome River Band (do you think I'll get Googled on that?) In the early afternoon I take a break and go down and feed the bunnies their grain and we have another talk and petting session. If the weather has been nice, I will have had bunnies outside in the pen for some fresh air, sunshine and play time. I have it set up by the barn in partial shade where I can check on them from the window. If a rabbit is scheduled for shearing and it's warm enough, I shear it out in the barn while listening to books on tape. I use scissors because I like the quiet time with the bunnies. If I'm shearing a doe and it's time to breed her, I put her in with the buck then.

After bunny chores it's usually back to the computer. Evenings are usually when I do dyeing, crocheting or spinning. Lily is always nearby whatever I'm doing, napping on one of the pads I have around to keep her warm. Sometimes I get invited out; tomorrow I'm going to go to the Chinese restaurant with Kym and help her with her taxes. But there are many days when I don't leave the house and I'm really enjoying that. For a few years I wasn't able to stay at home at all!

This week is going to be a little different. My father is moving in with me at the end of the month, and I have to do some packing away and getting organized so he can come. A large spinning stash and the stock for the bookstore and all the stuff from the auctions is here and EVERYWHERE, and it's time to make some room!

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